Easy Pasta

Easy Pasta by Steve Haines

Using Kamut flour to make pasta is easy, beautiful, and delicious.  The dough is very flexible even more than semolina and a golden color.  The Kamut whole wheat makes a very different and very tasty pasta from store-bought whole wheat pasta.  Kids will love this!

KAMUT® brand khorasan wheat, in addition to being an ancient grain preserved from hybridization or modification and always organically grown, is an excellent source of protein, fiber, zinc, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin B1 (thiamin), and vitamin B3 (niacin).  One cup of cooked Kamut flour provides the daily required fiber of 17% for men and 27% for women.  Kamut has 40% more protein than conventional flour.

We grind the Kamut wheat berries to make flour although starting with pre-ground flour works perfectly.

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All you need is flour, eggs, and a tiny amount of water.  A small starter batch uses:

163g of Kamut flour and 2 eggs.

For a larger batch and a half that will make enough for a large pan of lasagna, use:

245g of Kamut flour and three eggs.

Put the flour on a counter with a bowl-shaped indention in the middle.  Crack in the eggs into the indentation and mix with fork, scraper or hands.

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If the mix is too dry to hold together add a very tiny amount of water.  Make a ball and knead the mixed dough for a full 5 minutes.  It will become smooth and shiny.

Put the dough in a plastic bag and let it rest for 60 minutes.  We use a pasta machine to roll out the pasta from the dough, but a rolling pin will work too.  Take a small chunk of dough to roll out.  If using the machine, flatten the piece by hand and run through the machine starting on the #1 setting and advancing through to #5.

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Carefully lay the pasta on kitchen towels to dry some.

For our lasagna, we cut the strips and use them directly in the pan layering all the ingredients.  It has a beautiful golden color and great taste.

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Home Grown New Mexico is having a field tour of many kinds of ancient wheat planted by the Rio Grande Grain Team.  You will be able to see Kamut grain and many others growing and have tastings of many kinds of wheat delicacies.  June 20th, sign up online homegrownnewmexico.org.

One response to “Easy Pasta

  1. Kimberly Sheehan

    Good morning Jannine,

    It was great to see you last weekend and thank you for all of the tips and info! Your place is wonderful!

    We would love to have you out here sometime on our “baby” farm in Jaconita. Let me know if you are interested – Kim Sheehan 505 795 9622

    Here is the information for the person making the Johnson Su compost. His name is Matt Batchelder and he can supply you with any information you would like and he has some testing pending on his latest batch. This is the high fungal count compost that is made in a homemade bioreactor bin that was developed by Dr. Johnson and his wife down at NMSU in Las Cruces. Dr. Johnson now runs the Regenerative Agriculture program at Chico State University in California as well. This compost has been proven in many trials to be immensely beneficial to soil health and crop production and is probably our best chance at surviving and thriving! in these droughts that are our new normal.

    Thank you for all you do! best, Kim and Chris

    On Tue, May 11, 2021 at 8:17 AM Home Grown New Mexico wrote:

    > giant veggie gardener posted: ” Easy Pasta by Steve Haines Using Kamut > flour to make pasta is easy, beautiful, and delicious. The dough is very > flexible even more than semolina and a golden color. The Kamut whole wheat > makes a very different and very tasty pasta from store-bought ” >

    Like

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