Category Archives: FOOD PRESERVATION

MEET THE WHEAT

img_6079

SONORAN WHITE WHEAT
Sonoran White wheat was introduced to the Southwestern United States and Northern Mexico in the 16th century by the Spanish colonizers to make communion wafers and provide sustenance and it became a staple in the local cuisine as exemplified by the flour tortilla.  It is adapted to this region’s growing conditions and is very hardy and drought tolerant, thrives in alkaline soil and it is disease resistant. Wheat was a useful food crop as it could be planted in the fall and grown in winter and early spring before the native crops of corn, beans and squash which are all warm season crops. As recently as 100 years ago southern CA, Sonora, Mexico, New Mexico and Arizona were major wheat producers and Sonoran White was a widely grown variety.

Sonoran White is now being rediscovered by eaters and bakers and farmers interested in heritage wheat as an alternative to industrialized dwarf modern wheat.  Older wheat varieties are incredibly hardy and need less inputs and lend themselves to regenerative organic farming.  As a fall planted crop, grains can provide living root systems in the soil all winter long which reduces erosion and builds soil fertility and sequesters carbon from the atmosphere.  Ancient and heritage grains also contain more nutrients which have been bred out of modern wheat in favor of a high starch content.  Heritage wheat also offer an incredible array of flavors and textures not found in supermarket wheat.

It is a soft white wheat meaning that its outer bran layer is light in color and it has a low gluten/protein content which makes it excellent for pastries and tortillas where gluten strength is not required.  It makes a very stretchy dough which rolls out very well. When you mill whole berry Sonoran White wheat you get a 100% wholegrain flour with a lovely pale golden color much lighter than standard whole wheat.  It’s flavor is rich, smooth and nutty and it  is a great choice if you want to work in more wholegrain flour into your baking.

sonoran-white-wheat

It is a soft white wheat meaning that its outer bran layer is light in color and it has a low gluten/protein content which makes it excellent for pastries and tortillas where gluten strength is not required.  It makes a very stretchy dough which rolls out very well. When you mill whole berry Sonoran White wheat you get a 100% wholegrain flour with a lovely pale golden color much lighter than standard whole wheat.  It’s flavor is rich, smooth and nutty and it  is a great choice if you want to work in more wholegrain flour into your baking.

If you are interested in exploring the wide variety of heritage grains available for baking a counter top grain mill is essential.  While there are many small mills producing heritage and ancient grain flours the home mill gives you access to a wider choice of grains and freshly ground flour is more nutritious and flavorful.   Whole grain flour tends to deteriorate rapidly after milling due to the volatile oils in the germ and bran.  Refined white flour has these super healthful components removed and so has a much longer shelf life.

image

The Rio Grande Grain project is one of many groups promoting small scale heritage and ancient grains.  We feel this is a needed component in our local food supply chain.  Here in New Mexico we can find amazing locally grown beans and corn at our farmer’s markets but the wheat and other cereal grains are under represented.  Farmers will be more willing to grow these grains if we are willing to pay a fair price and learn how to use them!

Let’s get started with the classic flour tortilla!

sonoran-white-tortilla

SONORAN WHITE FLOUR TORTILLAS
I’m no tortilla expert and I’m more familiar with making corn tortillas than flour ones but I just had to see how the Sonoran White flour worked in the homemade tortilla!  This recipe is 100% whole grain Sonoran White milled to a fine flour in the Komo Mio mill.  Whole grain flours tend to be thirstier and require more water than refined white flours so this has been adjusted for in the recipe. Whole grains also benefit from a longer resting time after adding the water to the flour to absorb the water.

Lard would be the traditional shortening but I used butter as it was handy.  Duck fat also was tasty.

Using a stand mixer combine the dry ingredients:

279 grams (2 cups) Sonoran White whole grain flour

15 grams (aprx 1.5 teaspoons salt depending on the type of salt)

5 grams (1 teaspoon) baking powder

With a paddle attachment drizzle in:

30 grams (2 tablespoons) melted shortening

180 grams (3/4 cup) hot water.

Watch the consistency here.  The dough should be somewhat wetter and stickier than the final consistency for rolling it out as it will get less wet as the whole grain Sonoran White absorbs the water during the resting period.

Knead for about 2 minutes then let the dough rest in a plastic bag 1-2 hours to fully hydrate the flour.

Make golf ball sized balls and rest covered on lightly floured surface for 20-30 minutes.

Heat cast iron pan or comal over medium-high heat.  When it is ready a few drops of water will sizzle and pop on the surface.

Since my tortilla rolling skills are abysmal I used a combo method to shape the tortillas.  First I hand flattened the balls into thick discs and then pressed these between plastic sheets in the tortilla press as if making corn tortillas.  This produced a nice round shape that was then hand rolled out as thin as possible.  You can also just handroll out the tortillas with a rolling pin.  Either way they should be thin enough to be translucent when held up to the light.

Cook tortillas on the hot pan until a few golden spots appear on the bottom.  Then flip over. Total time is about 20-30 seconds on each side.  Wrap in a clean towel and keep warm until serving.

SOURCES:
Until we have some local sources here in New Mexico you can find Sonoran White wheat at:
Hayden Mills, AZ
Native Seed Search AZ
Barton Springs Mill, TX
Breadtopia

PRESERVING LEMONS

 

Meyer lemons are smaller, rounder, and softer than regular supermarket lemons. They range in color from bright yellow to light orange. Originally from China, they are grown in Florida and California. They are most similar to the lemons grown in the Mediterranean for preserving.

Preserving Lemons
by Mike McGeary

What Are Preserved Lemons?

They are lemons packed in salt and lemon juice, a process that preserves them for many months without refrigeration.

The standard lemons in grocery stores have skins that are hard and have a strong flavor. The best lemons for preserving that are widely available in the United States are Meyer lemons, because their skin is soft and has very little of the bitter white pith found in standard lemons. Also, they are nicely mellow rather than tart in flavor.

I have found Meyer lemons at the Montañita Co-op and Whole Foods, and they probably are available at other grocery stores. The problem is that they are not always available, so you have to keep a lookout for them and get them when you see them. It is also necessary to use them within days of purchase, because the thin pithless skin does not protect them as well as the thick skins and pith of regular lemons. The short shelf life also makes them more expensive, but you won’t need that many to last your needs for months.

You can buy preserved lemons in jars from specialty stores and perhaps supermarkets, but I found that they do not compare in flavor with ones I make myself.

You can learn more about the origin of Meyer lemons, how they are used, and how they have become more popular from a National Public Radio story here:  The Meyer Lemon: More Than A Pretty Face

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why Preserve Lemons?

I began to preserve lemons because I like to make Moroccan tagines and couscous, and preserved lemons are a basic ingredient. As Paula Wolfert put it in her 1973 cookbook, Couscous and Other Good Food from Moroco (which is still in print): “There is, and I cannot emphasize this enough, no substitute for preserved lemons in Moroccan food.”

In other words, preserved lemons have a unique flavor.

Preserved lemons are also used across the middle east, not just in Morocco. For example, Yotam Ottolenghi of Jerusalem has recipes using preserved lemons in his cookbooks, including Jerusalem and Ottolenghi: The Cookbook.

I also chop the skin into vinaigrettes and marinades. Recently, I chopped up half a lemon skin and some of the pulp with chopped garlic, olive oil, and salt and stuffed the mixture under the skin of two large bone-in organic chicken breasts, before roasting them in the oven. Yum!

Many people, apparently inspired by Martha Stewart (see NPR story above), are using fresh Meyer lemons in baking, such as Stewart’s lemon and pine nut tart, but that’s an article for another day.

 

How to Preserve Lemons

Mise en place:

  • One-quart canning jar, preferably wide mouth for easier retrieval of the lemons.
  • Cup of non-iodized salt in a bowl, with a tablespoon to stuff the lemons (I use kosher but sea salt is fine).
  • About 12 Meyer lemons (about 8 for the jar, 4 to provide juice to top off the jar after it is filled with lemons).
  • Sharp knife.

Preparation

  • Sterilize the canning jar by filling with boiling water or running through the dishwasher.
  • Put a tablespoon of salt on the bottom of the jar.
  • Scrub the lemons, and cut the tips off the ends of each lemon.
  • Cut the lemons into quarters without separating the wedges. That is, (1) put the lemon on end, and cut down most but not all the way through the lemon. (2) Rotate one quarter. (3) Repeat Step 1. See the lemon on the left in the photo, above.

I learned a slightly different method: (1) Putting the lemon on end, cut down most but not all the way through the lemon. (2) Rotate one-quarter. (3) Invert the lemon. (4) Repeat step 1. See the lemon on the right in the photo, above.

TIP: I hold the knife at about a 20 degree angle so that I can’t accidentally cut all the way through the lemon.

  • Put a tablespoon of salt inside each lemon, reshape, and place in the jar.
  • Pack the lemons as tightly as you can. If necessary to fill holes, separate a lemon into halves. Put another tablespoon of salt between each layer (there will be about 2) and on top.
  • Fill the jar with lemon juice from the remaining lemons.
  • Place the rind from a lemon squeezed for juice on top.
  • Seal the jar and leave for a month or more before using any lemons, shaking daily for a week to thoroughly dissolve the salt.

After the lemons are ready, they do not have to be refrigerated, but refrigeration reduces the chance that a white mold will form on surfaces exposed to air. The mold is harmless and washes off when you use the lemon. (The purpose of laying the skin of a squeezed lemon on top is to provide a surface for any mold that might form, and which can be easily removed and discarded.) The best way to prevent mold is to keep the lemons always completely covered by juice.

To use, rinse thoroughly to remove the salt. Most Moroccan recipes will have you slice the skin into narrow strips and discard the pulp. It is possible to use some or all of the pulp—I usually do—but it will remain very salty, so be sure to reduce the amount of salt you would normally add. You can find many Moroccan and other recipes that use preserved lemons online.

ENJOY!

 

When Life Gives You Cucumbers, Make Pickles!

WHEN LIFE GIVES YOU CUCUMBERS, MAKE PICKLES!
by Teri Buhl

All year long, people ask me how to pickle or ferment cucumbers. In summer, when cucumbers are just beginning to come in for harvest, they’re still small and perfect for fermentation, especially if you don’t have enough for a whole crock (which I’ll get to shortly). In a few weeks, when you have more cukes than you know what to do with, process/can them in a vinegar-based solution and make dill pickles (or ferment them). Toward the end of the harvest, those irregular shapes and sizes are perfect for bread and butter pickles and relishes. End of the season cucumbers often have a bitter edge, so use recipes designed to mitigate that bitterness by soaking overnight and/or sweetening the pot.

SMALL SCALE FERMENTATION

Half-Sour Pickle

Before humans discovered pasteurization, we fermented almost everything – intentionally or not! Yeast and lacto-bacilli are everywhere, and these opportunists are what make fermentation possible. I grew up in the Detroit area, and every Jewish or New York style deli had a big jar on the counter with beautiful, delicious “half-sour” pickles floating in it (also called Kosher Dills). A half-sour simply means that the cucumber has been in the brine for a few days and is still crisp and mostly bright green. Once fully fermented and olive green in color, they’re called full-sours.

Full-Sour Pickle

 

When we humans lived in a mostly agrarian society, our equipment was geared toward large batches of produce, so fermentation crocks were large, e.g., crocks and barrels. My first pickling crock was an expensive 5-gallon vessel, and I guarded it with my life! Today, we’re fortunate to have companies that make pickling in a 1-quart, half-gallon, or 1-gallon jar easy and relatively inexpensive. These jars are small enough to sit on your kitchen counter and most are glass, so you can watch what’s happening. They are also more sanitary and easier to clean than the equipment used by our grandparents.

In the recipe below, use a 1-quart mason jar with a ring, fermentation lid, and air lock to make pickles in 3 to 10 days. Once fermented to your taste, they need to be refrigerated to stop the fermentation process.   This recipe contains tannins (green tea leaves) to help maintain crispness, something I leaned from Karen Diggs at KrautSource.com. A saltier brine also tends to help keep pickles crisper.

Fermented Cucumber Dills

Ingredients

3 1/2 cups filtered water
1 – 2 Tablespoons high quality sea salt (Kosher salt is not standardized like sea salt is)
6 – 8 Kirby, Persian, or small cucumbers
2 sprigs fresh dill, or 1 teaspoon dill seeds
1 Tablespoon mustard seeds
1 bay leaf
5 – 6 cloves of peeled garlic
1 teaspoon loose green tea leaves or 1 grape or fig leaf (for crunchiness)

Directions

  1. Boil the water and pour into a non-reactive bowl. Stir in the salt and allow to completely cool.
  2. Trim off 1/4 inch of the blossom end of the cucumbers and poke a hole in the other end.
  3. Place all seasonings and garlic into a wide mouth quart mason jar, then pack in the cucumbers vertically. Cucumbers that are longer than the jar’s shoulder can be trimmed, but cut thick slices.
  4. Cover the contents with brine until it reaches about 1-inch over the top of the cucumbers.
  5. Place lid, ring, and airlock onto jar. Make sure enough water is in the airlock or moat at all times to keep out fruit flies and airborne bacteria. Ferment 3 to 10 days at a temperature between 65 – 80o
  6. When finished, replace fermentation system with a non-reactive lid, and refrigerate. Eat within 6 months.

Notes: Conventional wisdom says to keep the container out of direct sunlight, but UV light kills bacteria, so this is a point of debate. You can taste your pickles at 3 days to check on progress. If any white (Kahm) mold forms, simply remove it – it’s harmless. More rarely, anything pink, red, black, or slimy should be disposed of – these can be harmful if eaten, and are usually a result of not having washed your produce or not having cleaned the equipment properly. Garlic has wonderful anti-bacterial properties and should be included in fermentation whenever appropriate.

If you are a Do-It-Your selfer, you can buy a plastic Mason jar lid, drill a hole in it, and put an airlock/grommet in it. Otherwise, you can find fermentation equipment at these links (and more). I’ve used them all and consider the first two systems the best, because they’re made of stainless, can be sterilized, and last a lifetime. Rubber and silicon are less expensive, but are subject to splits, peeling, and contamination over time. HAPPY FERMENTING!

THE FOLLOWING LINKS have equipment choices in many price ranges:

https://www.krautsource.com/collections/frontpage (Superb stainless airlock system)

https://www.farmandfleet.com/products/1316699-ball-2-pack-fermentation-replacement-pack.html (Stainless/plastic airlock system)

https://masonjarlifestyle.com/product-category/mason-jar-fermentation/ (Silicone lids with glass weights)

https://www.farmcurious.com/products/farmcurious-fermenting-set-with-recap-2-pack (Plastic system with lid that can go straight to refrigerator)

 

Sourdough Starter Crackers

 

I’ve been making sourdough for over 10 years and I wish I’d had tried these crackers sooner! They are very easy to make and are a veritable umami bomb of flavor. The tangy quality of the lactic acids in the starter produces a tastes reminiscent of Parmesan cheese. This is an excellent use for excess sourdough starter that we are generating during the Covid baking epidemic.

My starter is 25% wholegrain organic rye, 25% organic wholewheat and 50% organic all purpose white flour. It is 100% hydration meaning that it is half flour and half water by weight. It is a thick pancake batter consistency. Any sourdough starter will work and flavors will vary depending on your starter. If your starter is thicker just add water.

The crackers are 100% highly fermented flours which improves digestibility and nutrient availability.

Butter will result in a more tender, flakier texture while olive oil tends to produce a slightly sturdier cracker.

Any type of toppings can be added for flavor and texture. Some favorites are flake salt (black), sesame or caraway seeds, herbs de Provence and edible flower petals which are more decorative than flavorful.

To get started you will need:

¾ C inactive (unfed and straight out of the refrigerator) starter

2 T unsalted butter or olive oil

½ t salt

Flake salt for the top plus any additional toppings

 

Directions:

Preheat oven to 325F

Whisk together: starter, oil or melted butter, salt.

Line a cookie sheet with parchment or a silicone baking mat

 

 

 

Spread the batter evenly on the pan. Don’t worry about getting it all the way to the corners. It also does not need to be crazy thin. This amount will mostly fill up a standard household baking sheet. A rubber bowl scraper or an off set spatula works well for spreading the batter.

 

 

Bake for 10 minutes and then score with pizza cutter or a knife

Bake another 40-50 minutes until they are golden and firm.

Cool on wire rack and enjoy!

 

 

Feel to share your results with us on Instagram by tagging @homegrownnewmexico

 

 

 

 

2020 class/events schedule

Below are the classes/events schedule for 2020 with detailed info on each class and REGISTER through EVENTBRITE. You can also find this page through the CLASSES/EVENTS on the top menu on this website. You can print off an abridged version (to put on your refrigerator!) here: 2020 HGNM Class:Event Schedule Please note to get the MEMBER rate, you must be a member FIRST. Other wise you pay the NON-MEMBER rate. To become a member to get the discounted rate,  go to the MEMBERSHIP page in the top menu above and then come back here to sign up and register.

NOTICE:

DUE TO THE CORONAVIRUS, ALL MARCH, APRIL AND MAY EVENTS ARE CANCELLED. 

THERE ARE STILL MANY CLASSES AVAILABLE LATER ON THAT YOU STILL CAN SIGN UP FOR)

WE WILL RE-EVALUATE JUNE CLASSES AND WILL NOTIFY YOU WHAT IS GOING ON. PLEASE DON’T DESPAIR.

WE WILL RESUME THE REMAINING CLASSES WHEN WE CAN AND NOTIFY YOU.

_____________________________________

2020 schedule

MARCH 2020
Wednesday, March 18th 4 pm to 6 pm-CANCELLED DUE TO CORONA VIRUS Home Grown New Mexico Seed Exchange-FREE Get ready for the new gardening season! If you are looking for free seeds for your vegetable, herb or flower garden or have some seeds to share, start off this new gardening season with us at the Santa Fe Seed Exchange. This year, Home Grown New Mexico’s Seed Exchange is back at Frenchy’s Barn. Location: Frenchy’s Barn at Frenchy’s Park • 2001 Agua Fria • Santa Fe, NM Fee: FREE for everyone! No need to sign up-just show up! The Santa Fe Master Gardeners will be at the event with a table for gardening questions and will have handouts. ______________________________________
Sunday, March 22nd 4 to 6 pm-CANCELLED DUE TO CORONA VIRUS Spring Fling Potluck and Class Events Intro- FREE! Come to our Spring Fling Potluck and find out what Home Grown New Mexico classes and events are being held in 2020. Please bring a dish. Jannine Cabossel will go over the class schedule. Location: Chrysalis Nutraceuticals: 130 Siringo Road, Suite 103 • Santa Fe, NM Fee: FREE for everyone! No need to sign up-just show up!
_____________________________________
Sunday, March 29th
12 noon to 2 pm
Tsukemono Pickling Workshop-CANCELLED DUE TO CORONA VIRUS
Tsukemono are preserved vegetables that are pickled in salt, miso, shoyu, vinegar etc. They come in great varieties and forms and provide accent to meals. You don’t see a Japanese meal without tsukemono. In this workshop, varieties of tsukemono will be introduced, and there will be a demonstration of three types of tsukemono—lacto-fermented nappa pickles, amazake (sweet koji paste) pickles and miso pickles. This is different than a regular pickling class-way more exciting!
Sadewic was born and grew up in rural setting in southern Japan. After exploring different diets, she is incorporating all the lessons she learned and teaching Nourishing Traditional Japanese Cooking Classes at her little kitchen, focusing on fermentation. In 2017, she became a Certified Koji Professional and has been sharing the wisdom of her tradition with the community.
Instructor: Nao Sadewic
Location: Chrysalis Nutraceuticals: 130 Siringo Road, Suite 103 • Santa Fe
Fee: $5 for members/$20 for non-member
_____________________________________
APRIL 2020
Sunday, April 5th 12 noon to 2 pm-CANCELLED DUE TO CORONA VIRUS
Recycled Water and Wicking Beds
Richard Jennings of Water Management Associates is the state of New Mexico’s leading water management expert. He specializes in water conservation techniques, active and passive water harvesting systems, effluent recycling, septic systems, and landscape ecology.  
In addition to his day job, Richard has an extensive garden and greenhouse that utilizes wicking beds. He is also working on a solar thermal water heating project. This is a great opportunity to see several innovative water management techniques and meet a real expert in the field. Bring your questions and project ideas!
Instructor: Richard Jennings of Water Management Associates
Location: Richard’s property: 30 Camino Sudeste • Santa Fe, NM
Fee: $5 for members/$20 for non-member
______________________________________
Sunday, April 26th
12 noon to 2 pm-CANCELLED DUE TO CORONA VIRUS
Wake up! Get Your Garden Ready For Spring
Jannine Cabossel, The Tomato Lady, will show you how to prepare for the upcoming veggie gardening season. Come learn how to garden in our harsh enviroment. Give youself the ability to grow vegetables year round with these gardening tips!
Instructor: Jannine Cabossel/Tomato Lady
Location: Jannine’s mini-farm • 56 Coyote Crossing • Santa Fe, NM
Fee: $5 for members/$20 for non-members
_____________________________________
MAY 2020
Sunday, May 3rd
12 noon to 2 pm-CANCELLED DUE TO CORONA VIRUS
Leaf & Hive Brew Tour & Demo/Jun & Kombucha Making
Leaf & Hive Brew is now offering its unique Honey Brew probiotic alchoholic beverages to Santa Fe. Unlike regular kombucha, Andrew and Fred Lucas ferment their Jun beverages from green tea and/or oolong, with honey and add flavors such as ginger, hibiscus, and botanicals. The result is like a delicious sparkling mead! This is a rare opportunity to learn about this ancient brew and tour the facility. Afterward, we’ll participate in a tasting of what they have on hand in their taproom. Come thirsty! Only 21 years of age and older.
Location: 1208 Mercantile Rd. • Santa Fe, NM
Fee: $10, for members/$20 for non-members
_____________________________________
Sunday, May 17th
12 noon to 3 pm-CANCELLED DUE TO CORONA VIRUS
Cheesemaking-Buratta-NEW!
Hands on-learn how to make a soft, creamy Buratta cheese. Traditionally, Buratta has been made in Italy from cow or sheep’s milk. Each participant will make the cheese and take some home.
Instructor: Diane Pratt
Location: Steve and Alessandra Haines house: 52 Mansion Drive • Santa Fe, NM
Fee: $20 for members and $25 for non-members Hands-on: limited to 12 people-Waiting list will be available.
______________________________________
JUNE 2020
Sunday, June 14th 12 noon to 2 pm
Hypertufa Planter Workshop & Demo
Get ready for spring planting with these easy to make and durable plant pots that will look great in your garden and last for years. These rock like pots are wonderful for displaying rock-garden plants. They look like stone, but weigh less and can take whatever shape you want.
Instructor: Bob Zimmerman and Chris Salem
Location: Jannine Cabossel’s mini-farm: 56 Coyote Crossing • Santa Fe
Fee: $5 for members/$20 for non-members
______________________________________
Sunday, June 28th
12 noon to 3 pm
Lunch in the Field
Join the Rio Grande Grain team to tour and LEARN about the 2020 ancient and heirloom grain trials at Mergirl Gardens in La Villita, NM. This season we have 20 varieties of wheats, ryes, spelt and barleys being trialed. After the field tour enjoy a four course GRAIN BASED LUNCH featuring many of the grains we have been working with in the kitchen and in the field. The vegetarian lunch will be prepared by our grain team: Ron Boyd, Christine Salem, Deborah Madison, Diane Pratt, Jody Pugh, Hal Bogart and Alessandra Haines.
Location: La Villita, NM (North of Espanola-DIRECTIONS BELOW)
Fee: $25 for members/$35 for non-members • limited to 20 people
_____________________________________
JULY 2020
Sunday, July 19th
12 noon to 2 pm
Dehydrating the Harvest
Have you thought about getting a food dehydrator to preserve seasonal produce for later enjoyment? Do you already have a dehydrator and want to learn more ways to use your dehydrator than just drying apples? In this class, Bob will demonstrate how to preserve all kinds of food products, complete with recipes and tips for getting the most out of your dehydrator. Here are just some of the unique and tasty treats that we will explore-fruit chips, beef, turkey and tofu jerky, parmesan, tomato & zucchini chips, sun-dried tomato crackers, fruit rollups and leathers.
Instructor: Bob Zimmerman
Location: Jannine Cabossel’s mini-farm: 56 Coyote Crossing • Santa Fe, NM
Fee: $5 for members/$20 for non-members • limit to 20 people
______________________________________
AUGUST 2020
Sunday, August 2nd
12 noon to 2 pm
Getting Seedy: Why & How to Save Your Seeds
Join Master Gardeners & Certified Seed School Teachers Susie Sonflieth and Jody Pugh. In this workshop, you’ll learn the advan- tages of locally adapted seeds and how they offer resilience to climate change, how to get started saving seeds, which vegetable seeds are easiest to save, how to know when seeds are ready to collect, and how to store them. Plus, techniques for determining the viability of seeds & why we can’t save seeds from hybrid varieties.
Instructor: Susie Sonflieth and Jody Pugh
Location: Chrysalis Nutraceuticals: 130 Siringo Road, Suite 103 • Santa Fe
Fee: $5 to members/$20 for non-members
_____________________________________
Saturday, August 29th
12 noon to 2 pm
Reunity Resources Farm Tour
Visit Santa Fe’s community farm practicing organic and regenerative agriculture. Reunity Resources is working with closed loop nutrient systems using food waste from local businesses to create a variety of compost and mulch products using Aerated Static Piles and vermicomposting (worms). The compost operation has diverted over 5 million pounds of food waste from the landfill and sequestered much of that carbon in the soil increasing fertility and water absorption. The results are evident in the amazing variety of fruits, vegetables, herbs and flowers produced on the farm. The farm is committed to serving the community through education and outreach and donates much of the produce to local hunger projects. The farm stand will be open as well.
Location: 1829 San Ysidro Crossing • Santa Fe, NM
Fee: $5 for members/$20 for non-members
______________________________________ SEPTEMBER 2020 Sunday, September 13th 12 noon to 2 pm Wood Fired Pizza Ever wonder why the pizza that you make at home is not the same as what you get at your favorite pizzeria? One of the main factors is that a home oven never gets hot enough to cook pizza at the temperatures it needs. Come try baking pizza in a home built wood fired oven at 700 degrees and see the difference for yourself. We’ll discuss wood fired ovens, cover making dough with both sourdough and commercial yeast leavening and a variety of flours including heritage and ancient wheats. Sauces and toppings will be discussed, slathered and baked on a bunch of pies to sample! Instructor: Mike Warren Location: Mike Warren’s house: 747 Old Las Vegas Highway • Santa Fe, NM Fee: $5 for members/$20 for non-members ____________________________________ Sunday, September 27th 12 noon to 2 pm Tamales-More Masa in the Casa! Learn to make fresh, fragrant tamales with colorful local and heritage corns and a variety of creative and traditional fillings. We will explore nixtamalization and grinding the corn as well as using masa harina with various types of shortenings including vegan options. Try your hand at filling, wrapping and cooking tamales. Tasting and comparing both savory and sweet tamales will wrap up the afternoon. Dianne Pratt and Alessandra Haines are big fans of all things masa and work with the Rio Grande Grain project. Instructor: Diane Pratt/Alessandra Haines Location: Steve and Alessandra Haines house: 52 Mansion Drive • Santa Fe Fee: $5 for members/$20 for non-members ______________________________________ FALL POTLUCK2 copy Sunday, Oct 11 4 pm to 6 pm Fall Harvest Potluck–FREE bring a dish! Guest speaker: Deborah Madison Come listen to Deborah Madison-author of 14 cooking books and her latest book, a food memoir called ‘An Onion in My Pocket’ Location: Mike and Sherry McGeary’s house • 835 E. Zia Road Fee: FREE! But please register

Jamming Jellies Class -Sunday-Sept 22

 

 

 

 

 

 

PLEASE NOTE:
THE LOCATION FOR THIS CLASS HAS CHANGED.
THE NEW LOCATION IS:
130 SIRINGO RD. (East of St.  Francis)

With all the fruit harvests this year, you might be a wee bit overwhelmed! Come learn how to preserve these foods and make jams and jellies. Interested? Read on!

Sunday, Sept 22nd
12 noon to 2 pm

Jammin Jellies
What happens when we have a bountiful fruit year or when a friend stops by with a few pounds of fruit? If you’re not into crushing grapes with your feet-make jams and jellies! Even if you’re diabetic, you can preserve your own tasty, healthy treats.

Jam, jelly, butter, marmalade, preserve, or conserve–what are they? Is pectin always necessary, and what kind should you use? What sweeteners work? Is it OK to seal jars with wax like Grandma did? This workshop explores these questions and more!

Most of us don’t have root cellars today, but we have modern equipment and ingredients that extend shelf life and make exciting new recipes possible that Mom & Grandma only dreamed of. Tired of that boring grape and strawberry jam the supermarket sells? Attend this workshop and discover a whole new world of tasty fruit spreads!

Instructor: Teri Buhl
Location: 130 Siringo Road (just east of St Francis) • Santa Fe
Fee: $5 for members/$10 for non-member

Please sign up through Eventbrite below:

Eventbrite - Jam On!

________________________________

Apricots

It’s apricot season and they are out everywhere! It’s unusual to get apricots here in Santa Fe (about every 7 years) as usually a late freeze comes in spring and freezes all the blossoms, but not this year!

If you don’t have any apricots, don’t worry. There are apricots between La Choza restaurant and Whole Foods on Cerrillos in the Railyard Park for the picking. Last year I picked enough to make apricot jam.

I have a wonderful apricot jam recipe that has St. Germain’s liquer in it. St Germain’s is a liquor made out of elderberries and is delicious by itself but when added to apricot jam while cooking, it gives a wonderful floral nuance to the jam that is delicious. So I am excited to make more this year as I’m down to my last jar of apricot jam. The recipe can be found here.

Biochar workshop and Miso demo update

The first two Home Grown New Mexico classes have been completed. Both were great!

The first class pictured above, a Biochar workshop by Michael Reed was on March 25 down in South Valley, Albuquerque and the participants learned about biochar, what it is and watched how to do a burn to make biochar and then took a tour of Michael Reed’s property.

_________________________________________

The second class pictured above, a Miso workshop by Nao Sadewic, was last Sunday, April 8th here in Santa Fe. It was great learning about koji, miso and other Japanese foods. We had samples of different foods made with koji, a slide presentation and a demo on how to make miso.

Miso Class and Demo-this Sunday-FINISHED

The Miso class is this coming Sunday, April 8th. THE CUT OFF IS TODAY (THURSDAY) FOR SIGN UP SO HURRY.  YOU MUST SIGN UP AND PAY BELOW IF YOU WANT TO COME!

 

 

 

 

Sunday, April 8th—12 noon to 2 pm
Miso Workshop and Demonstration
Miso is created by fermenting rice Koji, salt and soybeans.
This flavorful, enzyme-packed condiment can be used for many dishes. In this workshop, you will learn: variety of miso, why miso is considered to be healthy food, and how to incorporate miso into everyday diet. The instructor will do a miso making demonstration.

Instructor: Nao Sadewic
Location:  (Santa Fe Area HomeBuilders Association-next to Habitat ReStore on south side) • 2520 Camino Entrada
Santa Fe, NM
Fee: $15 per person for members or non-members

Please sign up through Eventbrite:

Eventbrite - Miso Workshop and Demonstration

New Mexico Fermentation Festival-ticket available

Just got a phone call that 1 person has 1 extra ticket to sell to the NM Fermentation Festival tomorrow in Albuquerque as someone can’t make it. Price is $15. There may be more tickets available but someone wants to sell theirs.

Event: New Mexico Fermentation Festival
Time:  11 am-5:30 pm
Where: Gutierrrez-Hubbell House
Address: 6029 Isleta Blvd SW, Albuquerque, NM 87105
Phone: (505) 244-0507

To see more info on the festival: http://nmfermentationfest.com/

To make arrangements to buy this ticket call:
Teri at 505-920-9383