From Top to Root (and Everything in Between): Eating the Whole Plant


From Top to Root (and Everything in Between):

Eating the Whole Plant

by Mike McGeary

When I was a child in Portland, Oregon, in the 1950s, my parents decided to grow as much of our food as possible. They bought what had been a dairy farm, which came with fruit trees and berries, and planted all sorts of vegetables, which we ate fresh, cooked, frozen, and canned. But despite this effort to get closer to nature, we still peeled our carrots and potatoes and discarded the turnip and radish tops. It wasn’t until years later that I realized that vegetable peels, skins, stems, and leaves were not only nutritious, but tasty. And there is less food waste.

It’s easy to document the added nutrition. According to the New Mexico Farmers’ Marketing Association, beet greens contain more iron than spinach; are high in vitamin B6, calcium, potassium, copper, manganese, and antioxidants; and have more nutritional value than the beet root. The same is true for turnips. One cup of turnip greens provides 115% Daily Value (DV) of Vitamin K, 37% DV of Vitamin C, 35% DV of Vitamin A, 27% DV of folate (Vitamin B9), and more.

Some of you may already cook the tops of root vegetable and eat carrots and potatoes with the skin on. But if not, read on.

To Peel or Not to Peel
Let’s start with the easiest way to add nutritional value, save time, and eliminate waste. You generally don’t have to peel carrots, sweet potatoes, potatoes, or other root vegetables or tubers even if you mash them. Just scrub them well with a vegetable brush to remove any dirt. You can also eat beets with the skin on, although the skins of large beets that have been in the ground for a long time may be too tough to eat.

Then there’s winter squash. Some winter squashes have skins thin enough to leave on when you cook and eat them. They include delicata, Rred kuri, small dumpling, and even butternut and kabocha when they are still petite.

Stem the Tide of Waste
Many recipes that include greens, such as chard, kale, and collards, direct you to remove the stems and discard them, but you do not need to, particularly if the greens are young and fresh. I generally eat chard and kale stems but find that collard stems are a bit too tough. I cut or strip the chard and kale stems out and either eat them raw or, if they are thick, cut them into 1-inch lengths and cook them with the leafy parts. Deborah Madison, in In My Kitchen, has a recipe for chard stems with lemon, which uses the chard and cilantro stems left over from her recipe for silky braised chard and cilantro.

Great Taste and No Waste!
Herbs like cilantro and parsley are used mainly for their leaves, but if the herbs are fresh and tender, you can chop up their stems with the leaves and add them to your dish. Less work for you, and the stems are as flavorful as the leaves.

When cooking with mushrooms, some people remove and discard the stems, but they can be trimmed and cooked with the caps. The stems can also be saved and added to other vegetable scraps to make stock (we keep all our scraps in a resealable bag in the freezer).

Start at the Top
In addition to the traditional greens, you can also eat the leafy tops of root vegetables, such as carrots, beets, turnips, and radishes. A tip: You will find the freshest tops at a farmers’ market; by the time they get to a supermarket, they are often over the hill or may have been removed. Another tip: Andrea Bemis, of Tumbleweed Farm in Oregon, recommends in her cookbook Dishing Up the Dirt that you separate the tops from the roots when you get home and store them separately or the greens will leach the moisture from the roots and make them go soft too soon.

There are numerous ways to cook the tops of root vegetables. On our farm in Oregon, my mother steamed the beet tops and served them as a side dish with a dash of red wine vinegar on top. Deborah Madison has a recipe for braised turnip greens in The New Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone. The Santa Fe Farmers’ Market Institute (SFFMI) has a recipe for creamed turnips and greens on its website: https://farmersmarketinstitute.org/tag/market-fresh-cooking/. The tops of the small white Asian turnips sold at the Santa Fe Farmers’ Market are especially easy to cook and good to eat.

Radish greens, if they are fresh, are delicious raw in a salad, but some people might not like the fuzzy surface. When you cook them, however, the fuzziness disappears but the peppery taste remains. A recipe for braising radishes with their leaves is on the SFFMI website.

Carrot tops—yes, carrot tops—are also edible. The SFFMI website has a recipe for sautéed carrots served with carrot top pesto. At our house, we like carrot top salsa verde with pickle juice, from Mads Refslund’s cookbook, Scraps, Wilt + Weeds: Turning Waste Food into Plenty. We put it on chicken, pork, fish, and vegetables.

Though not root vegetables, celery and fennel also have several useful parts. Generally, we freeze the celery leaves with other scraps saved for making vegetable stock, but they can also be added to a green salad. The fennel bulb is the most commonly used part of the plant, but the fronds can be chopped and sprinkled on the cooked fennel bulbs or sprinkled on a salad. Scraps, Wilt + Weeds has a recipe for fennel pesto using fennel stalks—the part between the bulb and the fronds.

Additional Reading and Related Topics
For further reading, I would recommend Deborah Madison’s Vegetable Literacy, which includes a section for most vegetables on “Using the Whole Plant.” Mads Refslund’s book, Scraps, Wilt + Weeds: Turning Wasted Food into Plenty focuses on waste prevention—using not only all the edible parts of plants, but also wilted, dried out, and otherwise over-the-hill vegetables and fruits. His recipe for vegetable scrap and peel stock lists additional plant parts that can be used, such as onion peels, cauliflower and cabbage cores, and stems of herbs, such as parsley, rosemary, and thyme. He also has chapters on making the most of meat, seafood, and dairy products.

Finally, as a last resort, you can compost vegetable and fruit scraps that you don’t want to eat or save for stock. Our worm bed produces wonderful compost that we use to help grow the next generation of vegetables in our garden.

And finally, finally, if you enjoy using all parts of your vegetables, you might look into related activities, such as foraging for wild plants, edible flowers (such as nasturtium flowers and chive blossoms), and herb vinegars, which are topics to explore another time.

Sourdough Starter Crackers

 

I’ve been making sourdough for over 10 years and I wish I’d had tried these crackers sooner! They are very easy to make and are a veritable umami bomb of flavor. The tangy quality of the lactic acids in the starter produces a tastes reminiscent of Parmesan cheese. This is an excellent use for excess sourdough starter that we are generating during the Covid baking epidemic.

My starter is 25% wholegrain organic rye, 25% organic wholewheat and 50% organic all purpose white flour. It is 100% hydration meaning that it is half flour and half water by weight. It is a thick pancake batter consistency. Any sourdough starter will work and flavors will vary depending on your starter. If your starter is thicker just add water.

The crackers are 100% highly fermented flours which improves digestibility and nutrient availability.

Butter will result in a more tender, flakier texture while olive oil tends to produce a slightly sturdier cracker.

Any type of toppings can be added for flavor and texture. Some favorites are flake salt (black), sesame or caraway seeds, herbs de Provence and edible flower petals which are more decorative than flavorful.

To get started you will need:

¾ C inactive (unfed and straight out of the refrigerator) starter

2 T unsalted butter or olive oil

½ t salt

Flake salt for the top plus any additional toppings

 

Directions:

Preheat oven to 325F

Whisk together: starter, oil or melted butter, salt.

Line a cookie sheet with parchment or a silicone baking mat

 

 

 

Spread the batter evenly on the pan. Don’t worry about getting it all the way to the corners. It also does not need to be crazy thin. This amount will mostly fill up a standard household baking sheet. A rubber bowl scraper or an off set spatula works well for spreading the batter.

 

 

Bake for 10 minutes and then score with pizza cutter or a knife

Bake another 40-50 minutes until they are golden and firm.

Cool on wire rack and enjoy!

 

 

Feel to share your results with us on Instagram by tagging @homegrownnewmexico

 

 

 

 

Bugs in your yard….. a closer look

Take a walk around your yard and garden and you will quickly see that there are a lot of bugs and insects there; a lot of them! Some are beneficial and some can be real pests. A general bug killer will get rid of them all, but that is just ignorant and wrong. How good are you at telling them apart and what you can do to control the pesky ones? You know, the ones that can ruin your plants and make you want to quit gardening altogether!

Most of us know some of the good ones; bees, ladybugs and praying mantises for example, and some of the pests like aphids, squash bugs and flea beetles. But we may not recognize them in their immature stages when they can often be more voracious feeders. So… let’s take a look at some more insects in your yard and see how many you can recognize as either a “good bug” J or “bad bug” L

ladybug larva

 

#1 This is the larva of ladybug and it actually eat more aphids than the adult. J

 

 

 

 

praying mantis egg case

#2 This is an egg case of the praying mantis. The female creates a foamy mass full of eggs that dries and protects the eggs over winter. Just leave it alone.In the spring, the young emerge fully formed and begin eating aphids, leafhoppers, mosquitoes and caterpillars. J

 

 

pill bug

 

#3 Pill bug. You might think these “roly-polys are harmless detritivores but they can take out a whole row of seedlings overnight! Use Sluggo Plus to keep them under control.  L

 

 

 

spined soldier bug

spined soldier larva

#4 The spined soldier bug is a common stink bug and a great predator of the gypsy moth caterpillar, and the larval forms of the Colorado potato beetle and the Mexican bean beetle. The immature form looks somewhat like a ladybug. J

 

lacewing larva

lacewing adult

#5 The lacewing larva is the main predatory stage where they feed mainly on aphids. The adults are fragile looking, weak fliers and squash vine borergesubsist on nectar and pollen. J

 

leafhopper

#6 Leafhoppers are very tiny insects that can carry the curly top virus which will     kill your tomato plants and can damage peppers, beans, potatoes, spinach, beets as well. There is no cure. Cover your plants with row cloth to prevent the leafhopper from infecting them. Remove the cover in July when the monsoons arrive. J

 

squash vine borer

squash vine borer larva damage

#7 Squash vine borer. If you see this brightly colored insect watch out!   She’s about to lay eggs on the stem of your squash plant at ground level. The larvae will burrow into the stem and feed off the plant tissue causing the leaves to wilt. You might at first think that the plant needs watering, but take a closer look at the stem and you will see yellow-orange frass, or droppings around a hole. Once the larva has entered the stem, it’s very difficult to save the plant. Prevention is key. You can try covering the plants with row cover until the blossoms open. They overwinter in cocoons in the soil so don’t plant your squash in the same place as last year. Make sure you dispose of all squash vines at the end of the growing season. L

 

sphinx moth

tomato hornworm

#8 Sphinx moth. Often called the ‘humming bird moth”, it appears in the garden in late afternoons and evening. Enjoy the adults but be on the lookout for their caterpillars, called tomato hornworm. The female moth will lay her eggs on plants in the nightshade family including tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant, pepper. The caterpillars grow quickly and can defoliate your tomato plants.   Inspect your plants regularly and pick them off as you find them. L

 

ground beetle

#9 As their name suggests, ground beetles live in the ground and both they and their larvae are considered beneficial predators of soil invertebrates. There are over 2.000 species in North America. Just leave them alone. J

 

 

squash bug adult

squash bug eggs

#10 Squash bugs are the bane of all gardeners. These bugs inject a toxin into the plant and suck the sap right out of it with their sharp, sucking mouth parts. This causes yellow spots that eventually turn brown. The leaves will wilt because the damage prevents the flow of nutrients to the leaves, and then they will dry up and turn black, crisp, and brittle. To control these you must be vigilant. Look for egg masses and scrape them off the undersides of the leaves or cut them out. Once they hatch you will have a difficult time finding them all. If you constantly have trouble with squash bugs, try growing squash varieties that are more resistant to them, such as butternut squash. Good luck! L

These are just some of the insects that you will come across as you spend time in your yard. Learning how to control the harmful ones without using pesticides will result in more beneficials and a healthier garden overall.

For more information about these and other beneficial garden insects check out this pocket guide to beneficial insects of New Mexico.

https://aces.nmsu.edu/pubs/insects/welcome.html

Vegetable Gardening in Containers

Vegetable Gardening in Containers
by Jannine Cabossel/The Tomato Lady

Whether you’re new to vegetable gardening or an experienced grower, it’s worth considering growing produce in containers this year. We were all caught off guard with the coronavirus pandemic.

With some know-how, you can still find and grow seeds, seedlings, or larger plants in containers. Tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants are best planted as seedlings around May 15 or later. Most veggies like six to eight hours of sun, so find your sunniest location for them. Some cool season vegetables, like lettuce and peas, do better in partial shade. In all cases, when you’re growing in containers rather than in the ground, don’t forget to water more because the soil will dry out faster. Use a mulch like straw to slow evaporation from pot. Consider watering twice a day.

Potatoes growing in a basket. Photo Linda Archibald

Be creative about your containers. You can use any pot-like vessel with holes on the bottom for drainage. If the containers have been used before, sterilize the inside with a solution of two teaspoons bleach in a quart spray bottle of water and rinse well. If pots are new, you don’t have to do this. Use bagged potting soil, not garden soil, which may have pathogens. Completely wet the soil until moist like a damp sponge; it is hard to get many potting soils sufficiently moist. I moisten the potting soil in a bucket first and then I put the moistened soil into containers or pots before planting seeds or plants.

If planting seedlings or plants, place them so the crown, where the leaves come out, is level with the soil; do not cover the crown. When planting tomatoes, however, you can plant about half the length of the plant underground. The hairy stem will grow roots, which makes the plant sturdier. If planting by seeds, follow the depth and spacing on the seed packet.

Where to get seeds, seedlings or plants
Besides nurseries and big box stores, one of the best places to get vegetable seedlings or plants is at the Santa Fe Farmers Market. Many of the farmers there should be offering tomato varieties as well as other vegetable varieties.

Vegetables that do well in containers-most can be grown by seed.
Beans: Grow ‘bush’ varieties instead of vining ones. Put 1 plant in a 10–12-inch
pot. Can been grown by seed.
Cucumbers: Grow ‘bush’ varieties by seed. 1 to 2 plants can fill a 20-inch pot.
Eggplant: Transplant 1 eggplant seedling into a 10–12-inch container. Grow by plant only, not seeds, which take too long to start.
Kale and chard: 1 plant per 10–12-inch container; in longer containers you can put in several. Can be grown by seed or plants.
Leafy greens: Lettuces are among many greens that you can cut the outer leaves off of to eat and later cut again for another meal. Keep cool-season crops in partial shade. Can plant by seed or seedling. They do not need deep containers. There are warm season lettuces called Batavian or Crisphead lettuces that do well here in the summer.
Peas: Put tall supports in the pot when planting the seeds. I like to use sticks for them to grow up on. Grow many peas 2 inches apart in 10–12-inch pot or a long container. Place container in partial shade. It’s too warm now in June to plant peas but you can plant them in the fall again. Plant by seed into pots.
Peppers: Grow bell peppers and hot peppers from plants only, not seeds, which take too long to start. 1 plant per 10–12-inch pot.
Potatoes: Grow in large grow bags or containers. Put 4 inches of soil in bottom of container. Then put potato “seeds” on top of soil, eyes up, and cover with 3 or 4 more inches of soil. As plant grows, cover plant leaves with soil. Do not trim the leaves but bury them; they will grow through the soil. Continue to cover the leaves as they grow until you reach the top of the container. Then just let the leafy parts grow. The potatoes grow in the soil above the original potato seeds while the roots grow down. Harvest when plant starts to die. The Farmers Market is good source of potato seeds.
Radishes: Short or long containers work will for these crops. Plant seeds 2 to 3 inches apart. Plant by seed into pots.
Tomatoes: Grow by plant only, not seeds. Tomato plants need support. Use a tall stake or tomato cage to keep your plants upright. Plant determinate varieties, which typically grow shorter. For each plant use a 5-gallon bucket or equivalent with drainage holes. Plant the stem deep. Determinate tomatoes are perfect for containers.
Zucchini or summer squash: Plant a ‘bush’ variety. A single plant can fill a 24-inch pot. Plant by seed into pots.
Winter squash: Plant a ‘bush’ variety. A single plant can fill a 24-inch pot. Plant by seed into pots.

More coronavirus info

In the previous post we told you we are cancelling all events for the remainder of this year to keep everyone safe. Anyone who got a membership this year in 2020, will be transferred to next year starting in January 2021. We will try to offer the same classes next year if the instructors are still available.

In lieu of this very disappointing info and wanting to keep in contact with all of our followers and members, we will put out a post every week on subjects that are interesting for us on the board as we will be writing them.

That means we will be touching on anything from vegetable gardening info, kitchen gardening cooking, preservation techniques, bread making, pickling, beekeeping, seed saving and anything that has to do with self- sustainability.

If you haven’t done so already, please signed up on the left hand column of this website at ‘Follow Blog via Email‘ where we will notify you via email of any new posts.

EVENTS SCHEDULE UPDATED

For all those who signed up to be updated, we need to inform you of the following changes to our classes/events schedule due to the coronavirus. We aren’t comfortable with everyone being so close at our classes/events and will try to get the same event schedule for next year. If you did sign up for any classes June thru September, we will refund your money.

DUE TO THE CORONAVIRUS, WE ARE CANCELLING ALL EVENTS FOR THIS YEAR

Mini Seed Exchange-Shelter With Seeds

SHELTER WITH SEEDS

Open for the entire month of April. Hours: Daily during daylight hours only

As many of our local seed sharing events were canceled this season we are hoping to facilitate some seed exchange in our community now at the start of the growing season.   Many seed companies are maxed out right now trying to fulfill orders. Planting and producing local food and pollen sources is super important right now and the activity of planting is soothing for the soul.

Seeds can be brought to and taken from the SEED SHELTER through the month of April. People can come and go as they like during daylight hours.

THE SHELTER WITH SEEDS is located at Earth Nurse at the northwest corner of Burro Lane and Quail View off West Alameda. It is adjacent to Burro Lane Park at 3801 Quail View Lane. Please park on the street and use pathways across the field. It is roofed but open sided with plenty of fresh air and shade for the seeds. Earth nurse was stewarded by the Swentzell Family before us and the Pinde Pueblo people who raised turkeys here in pre-historic times.

The SHELTER is unstaffed and we ask you keep it tidy and cover and secure all seeds when done.

BRING ALL YOUR OWN SUPPLIES: baggies, envelopes, pens, hand sanitizer etc.

Please bring viable labeled seeds to share in rodent proof containers such as jars. Seed packets can be sorted by category in the boxes inside the bins.

BE CONSIDERATE and RESPONSIBLE

MAINTAIN physical distance from others. One party at a time in the shelter.

PRACTICE top notch hygiene: sanitize (bring your own) hands before and after handling seeds.

BRING seeds you have to share. Please label and secure in rodent proof bin or glass jar.

TAKE only what you will ACTUALLY PLANT this season.

RESPECT adjacent residences and stay clear of them.

SAVE open pollinated seeds from your crops to share in the future.

Local nurseries are still open as essential businesses! Patronize them for supplies and additional seed.

SHARE your garden results with everyone #shelterwithseeds

changes in the class/event schedule

For all those who signed up to be updated, we need to inform you of the following changes to our classes/events schedule due to the coronavirus. We aren’t comfortable with everyone being so close at our classes/events and will try to get the same event schedule for next year.

DUE TO THE CORONAVIRUS, WE ARE CANCELLING ALL EVENTS FOR THIS YEAR

 

 

 

 

 

2020 class/events schedule

Below are the classes/events schedule for 2020 with detailed info on each class and REGISTER through EVENTBRITE. You can also find this page through the CLASSES/EVENTS on the top menu on this website. You can print off an abridged version (to put on your refrigerator!) here: 2020 HGNM Class:Event Schedule Please note to get the MEMBER rate, you must be a member FIRST. Other wise you pay the NON-MEMBER rate. To become a member to get the discounted rate,  go to the MEMBERSHIP page in the top menu above and then come back here to sign up and register.

NOTICE:

DUE TO THE CORONAVIRUS, ALL MARCH, APRIL AND MAY EVENTS ARE CANCELLED. 

THERE ARE STILL MANY CLASSES AVAILABLE LATER ON THAT YOU STILL CAN SIGN UP FOR)

WE WILL RE-EVALUATE JUNE CLASSES AND WILL NOTIFY YOU WHAT IS GOING ON. PLEASE DON’T DESPAIR.

WE WILL RESUME THE REMAINING CLASSES WHEN WE CAN AND NOTIFY YOU.

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2020 schedule

MARCH 2020
Wednesday, March 18th 4 pm to 6 pm-CANCELLED DUE TO CORONA VIRUS Home Grown New Mexico Seed Exchange-FREE Get ready for the new gardening season! If you are looking for free seeds for your vegetable, herb or flower garden or have some seeds to share, start off this new gardening season with us at the Santa Fe Seed Exchange. This year, Home Grown New Mexico’s Seed Exchange is back at Frenchy’s Barn. Location: Frenchy’s Barn at Frenchy’s Park • 2001 Agua Fria • Santa Fe, NM Fee: FREE for everyone! No need to sign up-just show up! The Santa Fe Master Gardeners will be at the event with a table for gardening questions and will have handouts. ______________________________________
Sunday, March 22nd 4 to 6 pm-CANCELLED DUE TO CORONA VIRUS Spring Fling Potluck and Class Events Intro- FREE! Come to our Spring Fling Potluck and find out what Home Grown New Mexico classes and events are being held in 2020. Please bring a dish. Jannine Cabossel will go over the class schedule. Location: Chrysalis Nutraceuticals: 130 Siringo Road, Suite 103 • Santa Fe, NM Fee: FREE for everyone! No need to sign up-just show up!
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Sunday, March 29th
12 noon to 2 pm
Tsukemono Pickling Workshop-CANCELLED DUE TO CORONA VIRUS
Tsukemono are preserved vegetables that are pickled in salt, miso, shoyu, vinegar etc. They come in great varieties and forms and provide accent to meals. You don’t see a Japanese meal without tsukemono. In this workshop, varieties of tsukemono will be introduced, and there will be a demonstration of three types of tsukemono—lacto-fermented nappa pickles, amazake (sweet koji paste) pickles and miso pickles. This is different than a regular pickling class-way more exciting!
Sadewic was born and grew up in rural setting in southern Japan. After exploring different diets, she is incorporating all the lessons she learned and teaching Nourishing Traditional Japanese Cooking Classes at her little kitchen, focusing on fermentation. In 2017, she became a Certified Koji Professional and has been sharing the wisdom of her tradition with the community.
Instructor: Nao Sadewic
Location: Chrysalis Nutraceuticals: 130 Siringo Road, Suite 103 • Santa Fe
Fee: $5 for members/$20 for non-member
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APRIL 2020
Sunday, April 5th 12 noon to 2 pm-CANCELLED DUE TO CORONA VIRUS
Recycled Water and Wicking Beds
Richard Jennings of Water Management Associates is the state of New Mexico’s leading water management expert. He specializes in water conservation techniques, active and passive water harvesting systems, effluent recycling, septic systems, and landscape ecology.  
In addition to his day job, Richard has an extensive garden and greenhouse that utilizes wicking beds. He is also working on a solar thermal water heating project. This is a great opportunity to see several innovative water management techniques and meet a real expert in the field. Bring your questions and project ideas!
Instructor: Richard Jennings of Water Management Associates
Location: Richard’s property: 30 Camino Sudeste • Santa Fe, NM
Fee: $5 for members/$20 for non-member
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Sunday, April 26th
12 noon to 2 pm-CANCELLED DUE TO CORONA VIRUS
Wake up! Get Your Garden Ready For Spring
Jannine Cabossel, The Tomato Lady, will show you how to prepare for the upcoming veggie gardening season. Come learn how to garden in our harsh enviroment. Give youself the ability to grow vegetables year round with these gardening tips!
Instructor: Jannine Cabossel/Tomato Lady
Location: Jannine’s mini-farm • 56 Coyote Crossing • Santa Fe, NM
Fee: $5 for members/$20 for non-members
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MAY 2020
Sunday, May 3rd
12 noon to 2 pm-CANCELLED DUE TO CORONA VIRUS
Leaf & Hive Brew Tour & Demo/Jun & Kombucha Making
Leaf & Hive Brew is now offering its unique Honey Brew probiotic alchoholic beverages to Santa Fe. Unlike regular kombucha, Andrew and Fred Lucas ferment their Jun beverages from green tea and/or oolong, with honey and add flavors such as ginger, hibiscus, and botanicals. The result is like a delicious sparkling mead! This is a rare opportunity to learn about this ancient brew and tour the facility. Afterward, we’ll participate in a tasting of what they have on hand in their taproom. Come thirsty! Only 21 years of age and older.
Location: 1208 Mercantile Rd. • Santa Fe, NM
Fee: $10, for members/$20 for non-members
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Sunday, May 17th
12 noon to 3 pm-CANCELLED DUE TO CORONA VIRUS
Cheesemaking-Buratta-NEW!
Hands on-learn how to make a soft, creamy Buratta cheese. Traditionally, Buratta has been made in Italy from cow or sheep’s milk. Each participant will make the cheese and take some home.
Instructor: Diane Pratt
Location: Steve and Alessandra Haines house: 52 Mansion Drive • Santa Fe, NM
Fee: $20 for members and $25 for non-members Hands-on: limited to 12 people-Waiting list will be available.
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JUNE 2020
Sunday, June 14th 12 noon to 2 pm
Hypertufa Planter Workshop & Demo
Get ready for spring planting with these easy to make and durable plant pots that will look great in your garden and last for years. These rock like pots are wonderful for displaying rock-garden plants. They look like stone, but weigh less and can take whatever shape you want.
Instructor: Bob Zimmerman and Chris Salem
Location: Jannine Cabossel’s mini-farm: 56 Coyote Crossing • Santa Fe
Fee: $5 for members/$20 for non-members
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Sunday, June 28th
12 noon to 3 pm
Lunch in the Field
Join the Rio Grande Grain team to tour and LEARN about the 2020 ancient and heirloom grain trials at Mergirl Gardens in La Villita, NM. This season we have 20 varieties of wheats, ryes, spelt and barleys being trialed. After the field tour enjoy a four course GRAIN BASED LUNCH featuring many of the grains we have been working with in the kitchen and in the field. The vegetarian lunch will be prepared by our grain team: Ron Boyd, Christine Salem, Deborah Madison, Diane Pratt, Jody Pugh, Hal Bogart and Alessandra Haines.
Location: La Villita, NM (North of Espanola-DIRECTIONS BELOW)
Fee: $25 for members/$35 for non-members • limited to 20 people
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JULY 2020
Sunday, July 19th
12 noon to 2 pm
Dehydrating the Harvest
Have you thought about getting a food dehydrator to preserve seasonal produce for later enjoyment? Do you already have a dehydrator and want to learn more ways to use your dehydrator than just drying apples? In this class, Bob will demonstrate how to preserve all kinds of food products, complete with recipes and tips for getting the most out of your dehydrator. Here are just some of the unique and tasty treats that we will explore-fruit chips, beef, turkey and tofu jerky, parmesan, tomato & zucchini chips, sun-dried tomato crackers, fruit rollups and leathers.
Instructor: Bob Zimmerman
Location: Jannine Cabossel’s mini-farm: 56 Coyote Crossing • Santa Fe, NM
Fee: $5 for members/$20 for non-members • limit to 20 people
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AUGUST 2020
Sunday, August 2nd
12 noon to 2 pm
Getting Seedy: Why & How to Save Your Seeds
Join Master Gardeners & Certified Seed School Teachers Susie Sonflieth and Jody Pugh. In this workshop, you’ll learn the advan- tages of locally adapted seeds and how they offer resilience to climate change, how to get started saving seeds, which vegetable seeds are easiest to save, how to know when seeds are ready to collect, and how to store them. Plus, techniques for determining the viability of seeds & why we can’t save seeds from hybrid varieties.
Instructor: Susie Sonflieth and Jody Pugh
Location: Chrysalis Nutraceuticals: 130 Siringo Road, Suite 103 • Santa Fe
Fee: $5 to members/$20 for non-members
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Saturday, August 29th
12 noon to 2 pm
Reunity Resources Farm Tour
Visit Santa Fe’s community farm practicing organic and regenerative agriculture. Reunity Resources is working with closed loop nutrient systems using food waste from local businesses to create a variety of compost and mulch products using Aerated Static Piles and vermicomposting (worms). The compost operation has diverted over 5 million pounds of food waste from the landfill and sequestered much of that carbon in the soil increasing fertility and water absorption. The results are evident in the amazing variety of fruits, vegetables, herbs and flowers produced on the farm. The farm is committed to serving the community through education and outreach and donates much of the produce to local hunger projects. The farm stand will be open as well.
Location: 1829 San Ysidro Crossing • Santa Fe, NM
Fee: $5 for members/$20 for non-members
______________________________________ SEPTEMBER 2020 Sunday, September 13th 12 noon to 2 pm Wood Fired Pizza Ever wonder why the pizza that you make at home is not the same as what you get at your favorite pizzeria? One of the main factors is that a home oven never gets hot enough to cook pizza at the temperatures it needs. Come try baking pizza in a home built wood fired oven at 700 degrees and see the difference for yourself. We’ll discuss wood fired ovens, cover making dough with both sourdough and commercial yeast leavening and a variety of flours including heritage and ancient wheats. Sauces and toppings will be discussed, slathered and baked on a bunch of pies to sample! Instructor: Mike Warren Location: Mike Warren’s house: 747 Old Las Vegas Highway • Santa Fe, NM Fee: $5 for members/$20 for non-members ____________________________________ Sunday, September 27th 12 noon to 2 pm Tamales-More Masa in the Casa! Learn to make fresh, fragrant tamales with colorful local and heritage corns and a variety of creative and traditional fillings. We will explore nixtamalization and grinding the corn as well as using masa harina with various types of shortenings including vegan options. Try your hand at filling, wrapping and cooking tamales. Tasting and comparing both savory and sweet tamales will wrap up the afternoon. Dianne Pratt and Alessandra Haines are big fans of all things masa and work with the Rio Grande Grain project. Instructor: Diane Pratt/Alessandra Haines Location: Steve and Alessandra Haines house: 52 Mansion Drive • Santa Fe Fee: $5 for members/$20 for non-members ______________________________________ FALL POTLUCK2 copy Sunday, Oct 11 4 pm to 6 pm Fall Harvest Potluck–FREE bring a dish! Guest speaker: Deborah Madison Come listen to Deborah Madison-author of 14 cooking books and her latest book, a food memoir called ‘An Onion in My Pocket’ Location: Mike and Sherry McGeary’s house • 835 E. Zia Road Fee: FREE! But please register

Slow Food Santa Fe Beer Tour & Tastings

Our friends over at Slow Food Santa Fe have their first event which looks fabulous and we want to share it with our viewers. It will be a Tour and Tastings at Tumbleroots’ Taproom and Production Facility. To find out more about this event and sign up go to: Slow Food Santa Fe Tumbleroot Tour